Pasar al contenido principal
Displaying 1 of 1
Please select and request a specific volume by clicking one of the icons in the 'Find It' section below.
Disponibilidad
Imagen de portada ampliada
Reseñas de publicaciones especializadas

  Reseña del New York Times

Tales set in Maine, linked by an overbearing seventh-grade math teacher. ELIZABETH STROUT'S new "novel in stories" brings to life a hardscrabble community on the coast of Maine, a quintessentially New England town where people serve baked beans and ketchup when company comes and speak in familiar Down East accents ("ay-yuh"). But "Olive Kitteridge" is provincial only in a literal sense. One story takes place at the funeral reception of a man whose wife has just learned of his infidelity. Another features a hostage-taking in a hospital. Elsewhere, an old lover surprises a lounge pianist, sending her reeling back into painful memories. An overbearing mother visits her wary son and his boisterous, pregnant wife. Most stories turn on some kind of betrayal. A few document fragile, improbable romances. They encompass a wide range of experience. The presence of Olive Kitteridge, a seventh-grade math teacher and the wife of a pharmacist, links these 13 stories. A big woman, she's like a planetary body, exerting a strong gravitational pull. Several stories put Olive at the center, but in a few she makes only a fleeting appearance. It's no coincidence that the two weakest stories are the ones in which she is merely mentioned. Without her, the book goes adrift, as if it has lost its anchor. She isn't a nice person. As one of the town's older women notes, "Olive had a way about her that was absolutely without apology." Olive's son puts it more bluntly. "You can make people feel terrible," he tells her. She dismisses others with words like "hellion" and "moron" and "flub-dub." After swapping discontents, she says to a friend, "Always nice to hear other people's problems." But as the stories continue, a more complicated portrait of the woman emerges. Olive may hurl invectives at her son, but she also loves him, almost more than she can bear. Her husband is a kind man and she loves him too, although she has trouble expressing it. She's prone to "stormy moods," as well as "sudden, deep laughter," and she harbors a sense of compassion, even for strangers. In one story, Olive bursts into tears when she meets an anorexic young woman. "I don't know who you are," she confesses, "but young lady, you're breaking my heart." "I'm starving, too," Olive tells her. "Why do you think I eat every doughnut in sight?" "You're not starving," the girl replies, looking at this large woman, with her thick wrists and hands, her "big lap." "Sure I am," Olive says. "We all are." It takes extraordinary presumption to say this to a girl who is starving to death, but from Olive the remark seems well-earned. Because the main thing we learn about her is that she has a remarkable capacity for empathy, and it's an empathy without sentimentality. She understands that life is lonely and unfair, that only the greatest luck will bring blessings like a long marriage and a quick death. She knows she's been rotten; she has regrets. She understands people's failings - and, ultimately, their frail hopes. STROUT'S previous novels, "Abide With Me" and "Amy and Isabelle," were also set in New England and explored similar themes: family dynamics, small-town gossip, grief. Those books were good; this one is better. It manages to combine the sustained, messy investigation of the novel with the flashing insight of the short story. By its very structure, sliding in and out of different tales and different perspectives, it illuminates both what people understand about others and what they understand about themselves. Just as Olive's self-awareness and empathy develop over the course of the book, so does the reader's. Strout's prose is quickened by her use of the "free indirect" style, in which a third-person narrator adopts the words or tone a particular character might use. "The tulips bloomed in ridiculous splendor" is a narrative statement - but "ridiculous" is very much Olive Kitteridge's word. Similarly, in a description of a pianist, the clucking of communal disapproval creeps in: "Her face revealed itself too clearly in a kind of simple expectancy no longer appropriate for a woman of her age." These moments animate Strout's prose in the same way that a forceful person alters the atmosphere in a room. The pleasure in reading "Olive Kitteridge" comes from an intense identification with complicated, not always admirable, characters. And there are moments in which slipping into a character's viewpoint seems to involve the revelation of an emotion more powerful and interesting than simple fellow feeling - a complex, sometimes dark, sometimes life-sustaining dependency on others. There's nothing mawkish or cheap here. There's simply the honest recognition that we need to try to understand people, even if we can't stand them. 'Olive had a way about her that was absolutely without apology.' Louisa Thomas has written for The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times and other publications.

  Análisis de diario de la biblioteca

In 13 linked stories that delineate the life and times of fussy but sympathetic Olive Kitteredge, Strout beautifully captures the sticky little issues of small-town life-and the entire universe of human longing, dis-appointment, and love. (LJ 2/1/08) (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Análisis de lista de libros

*Starred Review* Hell. We're always alone. Born alone. Die alone, says Olive Kitteridge, redoubtable seventh-grade math teacher in Crosby, Maine. Anyone who gets in Olive's way had better watch out, for she crashes unapologetically through life like an emotional storm trooper. She forces her husband, Henry, the town pharmacist, into tactical retreat; and she drives her beloved son, Christopher, across the country and into therapy. But appalling though Olive can be, Strout  manages to make her deeply human and even sympathetic, as are all of the characters in this novel in stories. Covering a period of 30-odd years, most of the stories (several of which were previously published in the New Yorker and other magazines) feature Olive as  their focus, but in some she is bit player or even a footnote while other characters take center stage to sort through their own fears and insecurities. Though loneliness and loss haunt these pages, Strout also supplies gentle humor and a nourishing dose of hope. People are sustained by the rhythms of ordinary life and the natural wonders of coastal Maine, and even Olive is sometimes caught off guard by life's baffling beauty. Strout is also the author of the well-received Amy and Isabelle (1999) and Abide with Me (2006).--Quinn, Mary Ellen Copyright 2008 Booklist

  Reseña de Kirkus

The abrasive, vulnerable title character sometimes stands center stage, sometimes plays a supporting role in these 13 sharply observed dramas of small-town life from Strout (Abide with Me, 2006, etc.). Olive Kitteridge certainly makes a formidable contrast with her gentle, quietly cheerful husband Henry from the moment we meet them both in "Pharmacy," which introduces us to several other denizens of Crosby, Maine. Though she was a math teacher before she and Henry retired, she's not exactly patient with shy young people--or anyone else. Yet she brusquely comforts suicidal Kevin Coulson in "Incoming Tide" with the news that her father, like Kevin's mother, killed himself. And she does her best to help anorexic Nina in "Starving," though Olive knows that the troubled girl is not the only person in Crosby hungry for love. Children disappoint, spouses are unfaithful and almost everyone is lonely at least some of the time in Strout's rueful tales. The Kitteridges' son Christopher marries, moves to California and divorces, but he doesn't come home to the house his parents built for him, causing deep resentments to fester around the borders of Olive's carefully tended garden. Tensions simmer in all the families here; even the genuinely loving couple in "Winter Concert" has a painful betrayal in its past. References to Iraq and 9/11 provide a somber context, but the real dangers here are personal: aging, the loss of love, the imminence of death. Nonetheless, Strout's sensitive insights and luminous prose affirm life's pleasures, as elderly, widowed Olive thinks, "It baffled her, the world. She did not want to leave it yet." A perfectly balanced portrait of the human condition, encompassing plenty of anger, cruelty and loss without ever losing sight of the equally powerful presences of tenderness, shared pursuits and lifelong loyalty. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
Resumen
WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE * THE EMMY AWARD-WINNING HBO MINISERIES STARRING FRANCES MCDORMAND, RICHARD JENKINS, AND BILL MURRAY <br> <br> In a voice more powerful and compassionate than ever before, New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth Strout binds together thirteen rich, luminous narratives into a book with the heft of a novel, through the presence of one larger-than-life, unforgettable character: Olive Kitteridge.<br> <br> At the edge of the continent, Crosby, Maine, may seem like nowhere, but seen through this brilliant writer's eyes, it's in essence the whole world, and the lives that are lived there are filled with all of the grand human drama-desire, despair, jealousy, hope, and love.<br> <br> At times stern, at other times patient, at times perceptive, at other times in sad denial, Olive Kitteridge, a retired schoolteacher, deplores the changes in her little town and in the world at large, but she doesn't always recognize the changes in those around her: a lounge musician haunted by a past romance: a former student who has lost the will to live: Olive's own adult child, who feels tyrannized by her irrational sensitivities; and Henry, who finds his loyalty to his marriage both a blessing and a curse.<br> <br> As the townspeople grapple with their problems, mild and dire, Olive is brought to a deeper understanding of herself and her life-sometimes painfully, but always with ruthless honesty. Olive Kitteridge offers profound insights into the human condition-its conflicts, its tragedies and joys, and the endurance it requires.<br> <br> NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR BY <br> People * USA Today * The Atlantic * The Washington Post Book World * Seattle Post-Intelligencer * Entertainment Weekly * The Christian Science Monitor * San Francisco Chronicle * Salon * San Antonio Express-News * Chicago Tribune * The Wall Street Journal <br> <br> "Perceptive, deeply empathetic . . . Olive is the axis around which these thirteen complex, relentlessly human narratives spin themselves into Elizabeth Strout's unforgettable novel in stories." --O: The Oprah Magazine <br> <br> "Fiction lovers, remember this name: Olive Kitteridge . . . . You'll never forget her. . . . [Elizabeth Strout] constructs her stories with rich irony and moments of genuine surprise and intense emotion. . . . Glorious, powerful stuff." --USA Today <br> <br> "Funny, wicked and remorseful, Mrs. Kitteridge is a compelling life force, a red-blooded original. When she's not onstage, we look forward to her return. The book is a page-turner because of her." -- San Francisco Chronicle <br> <br> " Olive Kitteridge still lingers in memory like a treasured photograph." --Seattle Post-Intelligencer <br> <br> "Rarely does a story collection pack such a gutsy emotional punch." --Entertainment Weekly <br> <br> "Strout animates the ordinary with astonishing force. . . . [She] makes us experience not only the terrors of change but also the terrifying hope that change can bring: she plunges us into these churning waters and we come up gasping for air." --The New Yorker
Displaying 1 of 1